Effect of feeding patterns on growth and nutritional status of children aged 0-24 months: A Chinese cohort study


Autoři: Qianling Tian aff001;  Xiao Gao aff001;  Tingting Sha aff001;  Cheng Chen aff001;  Ling Li aff001;  Qiong He aff001;  Gang Cheng aff001;  Xialing Wu aff001;  Fan Yang aff001;  Yan Yan aff001
Působiště autorů: Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Xiangya School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China aff001
Vyšlo v časopise: PLoS ONE 14(11)
Kategorie: Research Article
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0224968

Souhrn

Objective

This study was aimed to examine the effect of feeding patterns on growth and nutritional status of children aged 0~24 months.

Methods

We conducted a cohort study with an initial sample of 927 children. Considering the follow-up losses, 903, 897, 895, 897, 883, 827 and 750 children were followed up at 1, 3, 6, 8, 12, 18 and 24 months, respectively. Children were grouped according to exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) duration in the first 6 months: (1) never EBF; (2) EBF ≤ 3 months: EBF ≤ 3 months and stopped BF after 3 months or EBF ≤ 3 months and BF = 6 months or EBF ≤ 3 months and BF after 3 months, had formula and/or solids; (3) EBF for 3 ~ 6 months: BF < 3 months and EBF for 3 ~ 6 months or EBF for 3 ~ 6 months and BF < 3 months, had formula and/or solids; (4) EBF = 6 months. We used Z-scores to evaluate the growth and nutritional status of children, used the generalized estimation equation to compare the difference between feeding patterns.

Results

The generalized estimation equation results showed that Weight-for-age Z-score (WAZ), Length-for-age Z-score (LAZ), and Weight-for-length Z-score (WLZ) in different feeding patterns had statistical significance. The WAZ in EBF for 6 months group was higher in the first 8 months, in never EBF group was higher after 12 months old; the LAZ in EBF for 6 month group was lower than other groups; the WLZ in EBF for 6 months group was higher than EBF for 3 ~ 6 months group. The EBF ≤ 3 months group had higher underweight, stunting, and wasting rates. The EBF for 6 months had a higher stunting rate; the never EBF and EBF for 6 months groups had higher overweight and obesity rates.

Conclusions

In conclusion, different feeding patterns affect growth and nutritional status in children, so proper guidelines should be implemented to improve nutritional status and promote the growth of children.

Klíčová slova:

Birth weight – Cohort studies – Childhood obesity – Children – Labor and delivery – Obesity


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Článek vyšel v časopise

PLOS One


2019 Číslo 11