Management of veterinary anaesthesia in small animals: A survey of current practice in Quebec


Autoři: Geoffrey Truchetti aff001;  Colombe Otis aff002;  Anne-Claire Brisville aff003;  Guy Beauchamp aff002;  Daniel Pang aff002;  Eric Troncy aff002
Působiště autorů: Centre Vétérinaire Rive-Sud, Brossard, Québec, Canada aff001;  Groupe de Recherche en Pharmacologie Animale du Québec (GREPAQ), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Université de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada aff002;  Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, Bovine Unit, Burlington, Ontario, Canada aff003
Vyšlo v časopise: PLoS ONE 15(1)
Kategorie: Research Article
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0227204

Souhrn

Objective

To describe how small animal anaesthesia is performed in French-speaking Eastern Canada, and the variations between practices, in particular based on practice type, veterinarian gender and experience.

Design

Observational study, survey.

Sample

156 respondents.

Procedure

A questionnaire was designed to assess current small animal anaesthesia practices in French-speaking Eastern Canada, mainly in the province of Quebec. The questionnaire was available through SurveyMonkey, and consisted of four parts: demographic information about the veterinarians surveyed, evaluation and management of anaesthetic risk, anaesthesia procedure, monitoring and safety. Gender, year of graduation, and type of practice were tested as potential risk factors. Chi-square exact test was used to study relations between each risk factor, and the effect of the selected risk factor on each response of the survey. For ordinal data, the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test was used to maximize power.

Results

Response rate over a period of 3 months was 20.85% (156 respondents). Overall, the way anaesthesia is performed by most respondents does not meet international guidelines, such as patient preparation and evaluation prior to anaesthesia, not using individualised protocols (for 41%), not obtaining intravenous access (12.4% use it for all their anaesthesia in cats, and 30.6% in dogs), lack of patient monitoring at certain intervals for 55% of the responses, and client prompted optional analgesia (for 29% of respondents). Some practices are more compliant than others. Among them, referral centres generally offer better care than general practices.

Conclusions and clinical relevance

The level of care in anaesthesia and analgesia in practices in French-speaking Eastern Canada is concerning, highlighting the need for more sustained continuing education.

Klíčová slova:

Analgesia – Anesthesia – Anesthesiology monitoring – Cats – Dogs – Surgical and invasive medical procedures – Veterinary surgery – Small animals


Zdroje

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