Fibrinolysis in cardiac surgery in the post-aprotinin era


Authors: Špegár Ján 1,2;  Pazderková Petra 1;  Vaněk Tomáš 1
Authors‘ workplace: Kardiochirurgická klinika, Kardiocentrum, FNKV a 3. LF UK, Praha 1;  Anesteziologicko-resuscitační oddělení, Oblastní nemocnice Mladá Boleslav, a. s., Nemocnice Středočeského kraje 2
Published in: Anest. intenziv. Med., 22, 2011, č. 5, s. 260-264
Category: Anesthesiology - Review Article

Overview

The use of antifibrinolytics for prevention of massive haemorrhagic events and deterioration during the perioperative course of a patient is a routine practice in many cardiac centres nowadays. Following the withdrawal of the most powerful antifibrinolytic agent aprotinin, attention of the clinical practitioners is focused on tranexamic acid. This article summarizes the beneficial and undesirable effects of tranexamic acid and other antifibrinolytics used in cardiac surgery.

Keywords:
aprotinin – tranexamic acid – cardiac surgery


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Anaesthesiology, Resuscitation and Inten Intensive Care Medicine
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